Beautiful, Interesting and Ooo Shiny! Images From Various Places

India

The Exposure Triangle: Bringing it All Together

Location: India
Camera info: Canon Rebel 350 D • lens 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
ISO 800 • f 20 • 1/125 sec

Hey my fellow shutter-bugs! It’s been a while since I had a lesson, so I owe you one – and it’s just in time for you to take all those crazy family pictures during Christmas! Previously, I talked about Aperture and Shutter Speed. Today’s lesson is on ISO, as well as answering the question: so what’s the point of all of this?

ISO (International Standards Organization), or as old-school photographers would say, Film Speed, is simply a measurement of how quickly the media in your camera can pick up light. For example, think about the last time you moved. If you had to pack a truck, how long would it take to fill if only you were working? How long would it take if you had a whole team of movers? These scenarios would represent low and high ISO settings, respectively. Higher ISOs “pack in” light faster than low ones, allowing you to shoot better pictures in low light. They also introduce film grain (pixellation) at higher levels depending on your camera.

So now you have all three pieces of the Exposure Triangle, every photographer’s rule to taking properly exposed pictures. The main point is to keep the triangle balanced. When you adjust shutter speed down, you may need to open your aperture or use a higher ISO. When you set a high ISO to shoot at night, you will need a longer shutter speed or wide aperture, etc. You will know these three are balanced when your camera’s light meter is centered.

Now comes the fun part: with this knowlege, you can shoot any camera in manual mode and actually know what you’re doing! 😀 You can try several combinations of the three elements, just remember how else they affect your photos (aperture affects depth of focus, shutter speed affects blur, and ISO affects noise). Also, you can use the Tv, Av, P, and any other settings appropriately. Just know that Tv lets you choose your shutter speed & ISO, and it will pick the aperture for you. Likewise, Av does the same with letting you control aperture. P is fully automatic except for the focus & flash.

Ok, your turn! Try taking some pictures and let us know your experience in the comments. Did you get the image you were going for? Do you know why/why not?


When Life’s Journey Leaves Us Disappointed

Location: India
Camera info: Canon Rebel 350D • lens 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
ISO 1600 • f 4 • 1/100 sec

Don’t we look like FUN?!? 😀 The group of teenagers I traveled with one year took part in a street drama called “The Journey.” It told the story of a man searching for meaning in his life, and the different people he meets along the way.

This group of girls were the partiers. We drank a lot (ok, only pretended to), danced around with ribbon dancers, and generally made a lot of noise. It was fun… for a while. But eventually the partying took it’s toll. Those who had been drinking a lot got sick. Others got dizzy and tripped up our conga line. A fight broke out over the bottle of “booze.” Our party became a mess.

So the man moved on.

Even though we were just acting, I could relate to these girls. There have been many times I thought something looked like fun that turned out to be greatly disappointing. While I wasn’t much of a “party hard” type when I was younger, I chased after academic success, relationships, fame (part of me still wishes I could sing), financial stability, and other things that weren’t inherantly bad, but didn’t completely satisfy me, either.

I won’t give away the ending of the drama, you’ll have to watch it for yourself. But I eventually came to the same place as the man in his journey, and I found something worth putting all my effort into pursuing. And no, it wasn’t my degree in chemistry. 😉

What have you found that satisfies you and doesn’t leave regrets or disappointment?


FAILing With Style

Location: India
Camera Info: Canon Rebel 350D • lens 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
ISO 1600 • f 20 • 1/80 sec

Ever want to try something crazy, just because you can? A friend of mine decided to have some fun while walking around a rural area of India. There was a random pole in the ground, and we still never knew what it was for. But looked like fun! The guy was quite an acrobat.

Ever want to try something crazy, and it goes terribly wrong? The rest of our group had looked away for a moment, when we heard my friend call for help.  Apparently, he had missed when trying to get off the pole.

I bet it made quite a fond memory, having a bunch of teens try to help him get a pole out of his pants. At least next time we had a group sing-along, we had an extra soprano!

So what has been your biggest FAIL when you were trying to look good?


Forgiveness in Colorado

Location: India
Camera info: Canon Rebel 350D • lens 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
ISO 800 • f 11.0 • 1/100 sec

 It’s not too often the Shine4Him Photo blog ventures into social commentary, but I think this week’s photo deserves it (phrases taken from Exodus 3:5 and Psalm 100:4, painted on a church wall in India). So does the recent happenings in Aurora, CO in the USA.

In the week following this tragedy, there have been many stories emerge of heroism, sacrifice, and love. Tragedies tend to bring out the deepest emotions and people’s true selves. Anyone can claim what they think they would do in a situation, but we never know for sure until something forces us to act without thinking. That’s what the men who died saving their girlfriends were doing. Somewhere, they learned that was the noble thing to do, and when the moment came, they acted. Now the world is grateful, even through many tears.

Then there is Pierce O’Farrill, one of the other victims of the shooting. Despite having been shot three times, the moment he was released from the hospital, he told the press that he had forgiven the shooter. Again, this goes against the grain of what seems normal. No one blames the families who are angry at Holmes. I doubt few would be upset when justice is served. But what about this guy?

Forgiveness, in itself, is very freeing. For years, research has proven that bitterness only tears apart the person who carries it, and forgiveness allows the person to give up the “victim” title and move on with their lives. Personally, I hope everyone involved can eventually come to that point, though it will likely take years. And please note that forgiveness is not exoneration. I’m sure even O’Farrill would agree that the courts need to do their job. But this immediate forgiveness, and even a willingness to talk to and pray for the shooter? Now that’s something different.

O’Farrill links his actions to his faith in Jesus Christ. It takes more than just being a good person to forgive like that, I’ve found. It takes power beyond ourselves. But through the years, many have discovered the power that Jesus provides to forgive those who hurt them. Holocaust survivor Corrie Ten Boom also had to lean on her faith to forgive the man who tortured her and her sister. But both of these people have made the same amazing discovery – that forgiveness gives us a glimpse of the true nature of God, and in that, we can be thankful.

Have you ever struggled to forgive someone who hurt you? Where do you find the strength to move on?


Child’s Play

Location: India
Camera Info: Fuji Finepix A303 • Automatic Point & Shoot
ISO 100 • f 2.8 • 1/85 sec

Pattycake, pattycake, baker’s man…” Who knew that when our group hung out with street kids in India, that this game would be so popular? The girls especially were lining up to play a round of pattycake with us. While the kids here didn’t sing the same rhyme we did, they still knew the game. I’ve also found similar clapping games in other countries I’ve traveled to.

I’m amazed at how some things can travel cross-culturally so easily! For example:

  • Soccer is played throughout most of the world. All kids need is a ball and enough people to form a team.
  • “Rock, Paper, Scissors” is used in many kinds of decision-making in Japan, and kids in Somalia play Semut, Orang, Gajah (Ant, Man, Elephant).
  • India has a game that’s similar to capture the flag (or the first round of dodgeball, depending on how you play), called “dog and bone.”
  • In Japan, the kids loved to play “Duck, Duck, Goose” with our group. Chile has a version of this game as well, played with a handkerchief.
  • Most cultures have some form of Tag, but Pakistan puts a fun twist on it by designating safe zones on the ground or above it (“The floor is lava!”).
  • Kids in Korea play jacks, using small stones instead.
  • In the USA, we have marbles and cornhole. In Israel, they have Gogo’Im (apricot seeds).
  • There are also many more, including jump rope and hide-and-seek.

Have you ever played games with kids from other countries? What was the same or different?