Beautiful, Interesting and Ooo Shiny! Images From Various Places

Pictures That Pop

Location: Thailand
Camera info: Canon Rebel 350D • lens EF 70-200mm f/2.8L
ISO 200 • f 4 • 1/1000 sec

It’s been a while since I’m gotten all techy-minded on here, so this week’s post is for my photography friends. If that’s not you, feel free to sit back and read a comic today. I tried to find the details on this interesting Thai insect, but from all my research, the most technical name I’ve seen is “Oh look, a pink dragonfly!” So there you go!

Pictures like this one are the reason I love my 2.8 aperture lens! There’s just something so fun about making a picture where the background does a sudden fade-out and all you see is your subject in sharp focus. The use of light in out-of-focus areas of a photo is called a bokeh, and is a photography technique that really makes your pictures stand out. The aperture (f-stop) of your lens is one of the keys to getting a good depth of field (DOF). Setting it to a low number (1.8 up to 5.6, usually) will give a shallow DOF, while the higher numbers (11 and up) make the whole image sharp. Notice that I took this picture at f/4.0. Usually, the closer the subject is to the background, the lower the aperture you will need. I took my pic from several feet away using the telephoto zoom lens, so I could get away with using the higher end of the range.

This critter didn’t have much in the background I could play with, but if your subject has any sort of light coming from behind it, there’s another opportunity for playing with the effects. A wide open aperture (the lowest value possible for the lens) will give round light spots, while a higher aperture value will take the shape of whatever the lens blades look like (most are hexagons). Then some people get really creative and make up their own shapes.

There. Now don’t you feel smarter? 😉

What is the coolest photo effect you’ve seen or one you would like to learn?

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3 responses

  1. Pingback: Setting Up the Perfect Scene: Composition 1 « Pictures Around the World

  2. Pingback: Shutter Speed: Photography in Motion « Pictures Around the World

  3. Pingback: The Exposure Triangle: Bringing it All Together « Pictures Around the World

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